High School Students Taking Part In Group Discussion

High School Students Taking Part In Group Discussion

The introduction of widespread video technology has provided instructors with a very different way to teach and students with a new, and more effective, way to learn. The flipped classroom turns traditional college classrooms upside-down. In the traditional classroom, students spend most of the in-class time listening to lectures, with minimal time for discussion. In the flipped classroom, the lecture goes on-line, and class discussions and projects take over the classroom time.

Flipped classrooms provide instructors with additional time to work with students, answer questions, and facilitate discussions. For students, the flipped classroom addresses the needs of different types of learners effectively and provides significantly increased student engagement. In addition, research has clearly shown that the flipped classroom means higher grades and better student performance.

Five Steps to Flipping the Classroom

  1. Make a Plan
    Planning courses can take a bit more time for instructors, particularly initially. Most instructors work from the same sets of course notes and presentations each year. The flipped classroom requires some additional work, at least the first time the class is taught. Instructors will need to plan pre-class video segments, plus in-class activities. For classes taught each year, it’s easy to re-use materials and plans from year-to-year.
  2. Create Video Content
    Once course content is planned, instructors can create video content. Video content can include a variety of materials; shared videos, traditional lecture captures, uploaded content recorded on-site, and different short videos created with lecture capture or web capture technology.
  3. Share with Students 
    Share recorded video content with students. It’s important that students have access to video content on a regular schedule, and with plenty of time available to watch videos before the class period. Course content should be well-organized and accessible.
  4. Learn and Work in the Classroom
    Have a plan for class time that includes activities, discussion topics, and time for questions. In a larger class, you may need to alter activities to accommodate more small groups, use additional forms of technology, or think-pair-share activities. Expect your students to come prepared, but move forward even if students have not watched video content.
  5. Assess Results
    Regularly assessing student learning in low-pressure ways is an effective way to track student understanding and mastery. Online and video quizzes offer a practical way to do this, and provide one way to track student participation and preparation.